Mission

The GriefCare Place's mission is to provide a SAFE PLACE where grievers gather together, under the guidance of trained facilitators, to educate, encourage and uplift each other throughout the healing journey.


History


It was over 30 years ago when Lou-Ann Redmon, Founder and Executive Director of The GriefCare Place, recognized that widows needed support, encouragement, and reassurance that what they were experiencing as grievers was normal. She realized the impact they could have on each other by coming together and finding support in one another. This is how the first support group began to grow.

As the need for bereavement support grew, the vision for a stand-alone, non-profit organization specifically created to provide support for grieving children, adolescents, and adults was born. The GriefCare Place was founded in June of 1997, by Lou-Ann Redmon and other volunteers, to fulfill that vision. Since that time, The GriefCare Place has not only served thousands of grieving individuals and families, but it has also been utilized by churches, social agencies, schools, extended care facilities, nursing, psychology, ministerial, and medical students, hospices, and other community organizations. The GriefCare Place currently serves 64 communities in Northeast Ohio and is committed to bring hope and healing to broken hearts caused by the death of a loved one.


Did You Know?

Since 1997, we have served thousands of grievers and provided information for many others.


In that time, we have served people from 64 communities in Northeast Ohio.

Over 75 volunteers serve The GriefCare Place and count thousands of hours.

We offer support and programs for children, adolescents, and adults.

There are only a handful of organizations like ours throughout the nation.

There are no fees charged for any of our support group services.

There are no time limitations for grievers’ participation within our program.

Should the need arise, we are here for you, your family, your friends, and your neighbors.



Grief is not a problem to be solved, or a disorder to be cured; it's a process to be lived.